Mourinho’s "long term" Roma aim, Premier League return hint and England plan

Jose Mourinho had to just wait 15 days from his Tottenham sacking, before being handed his latest massive job in European football.

On Tuesday, AS Roma confirmed that the former Chelsea and Manchester United boss will replace Paulo Fonseca at the end of the season.

Mourinho's reputation, in English football in particular, is at it's lowest since he rocked up on these shores back in 2004.

But in Serie A, due to his exploits with Inter Milan, he is viewed very differently as evidenced by Roma's delight at getting a deal over the line.

"When Jose became available, we immediately jumped at the chance to speak with one of the greatest managers of all time," Roma's general manager Tiago Pinto said.

"We were blown away by Jose's desire to win and his passion for the game: no matter how many trophies he has won, his primary focus is always on the next one. "

So have we seen the last of Jose Mourinho in English football?

The 58-year-old has been at the top of his craft for almost two decades, but there are now serious doubts about whether he can cut it at the very highest level.

What was once seen as expert man-management, now appears alienating and divisive. What was once seen as a tactically innovative approach, now looks stale and boring.

But 'the Special One' still carries brand value that very few managers in the modern game can rival.

For him to get another top Premier League job however, it is likely his stint in the Italian capital will need to be a roaring success.

And Mourinho, who has now five different jobs in eight years, has hinted he hopes to be at the Stadio Olimpico in the long-term.

"After meetings with the ownership and Tiago Pinto, I immediately understood the full extent of their ambitions for AS Roma," he explained.

"It is the same ambition and drive that has always motivated me and together we want to build a winning project over the upcoming years."

If it does go to plan and he is once again a man in demand, he isn't likely to turn down any job, regardless of previous allegiances.

Few would have anticipated his Chelsea return in 2013 and perhaps even fewer would have expected him to move across the capital to join Spurs.

Asked about previous comments suggesting he wouldn't join the Blues' London rivals, he quipped: "Yes, that was before I was sacked.

"This is modern football. In relation to players, the Bosman law changed everything. In relation to us coaches, because of you [the media] we lost that stability."

One position Mourinho has been extensively linked with over the years is the England manager's job.

First courted in 2007, he admitted that his wife deterred him from taking the role and claimed he wouldn't look at international football until 2029.

“My wife told me not to take it and she was right,” he said back in 2014. "I’m not going to stay at home, I have to travel, I want to see the players, I want to participate in their evolution blah, blah, blah, blah. But in the end my wife was saying: ‘No football, no matches, is not good for you.’

“And she was right. It was not the job for me seven years ago, it’s not the job for me now and I don’t think it will be the job for me in seven years’ time. Maybe in 15 years from now but not seven.”

That date now looks tantalisingly close r and who would ever rule out Mourinho taking on England's next generation at the end of the decade?

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