McClaren opens up on mental 'trauma' after he was sacked by England

‘I didn’t feel like leaving the house’: Steve McClaren opens up on mental ‘trauma’ after he was sacked by England for failing to reach Euro 2008

  • McClaren was appointed after the 2006 World Cup in place of Eriksson
  • His reign was ended by defeat to Croatia in the final qualifier for Euro 2008
  • Lasting image of McClaren as England boss is of him stood under an umbrella

Steve McClaren has revealed the mental ‘trauma’ he faced after being sacked as England manager.

McClaren was appointed after the 2006 World Cup in place of outgoing boss Sven Goran Eriksson, but lasted just 16 months.

His reign was ended by defeat to Croatia in the final qualifier for Euro 2008, which meant England missed out on reaching the finals in Austria and Switzerland.

Steve McClaren watches England’s Euro 2008 qualifier against Croatia at Wembley

The lasting image of McClaren as England boss is of him stood on the sideline under an umbrella.

And McClaren said the experience made him seek help from a sports psychologist.

He told Sky Sports: ‘I remember after that England game [vs Croatia], talking to him [psychologist] and saying: ‘How the hell do I come out of this in one piece?’

McClaren’s reign was ended by 3-2 defeat to Croatia in the final qualifier for Euro 2008

‘Because I didn’t feel like leaving the house, the bedroom, engaging with people. I didn’t feel like any of that.

‘He just said: ‘Look, go in a cave, lock yourself in for a week, 10 days, however long, write down the experience, what you’ve learnt – good and bad – get it on paper, close the book, then get out there and get back on the horse and get back into management.

‘If I didn’t have someone telling me that, I wouldn’t have done it.

‘And I did that, got back on to the horse and came out of that.’ 

McClaren has revealed the mental ‘trauma’ he faced after being sacked as England manager

At the time of his sacking, McClaren’s stint of 18 games in charge was the shortest of any England manager in history, beaten only since by Sam Allardyce (who lasted just one match). 

He added: ‘I think that’s the key to this mental health issue is it’s a trauma, it really is like trauma incidents like that.

‘To recover from that trauma the only way you can do that is accepting you’ve got a problem, seek help, you’ve got to talk.

‘And when you talk you’ve got to open up and be so honest.’




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