Which of the College Football Playoff teams is the most likable, according to Twitter?
NFL 

Twitter users and members of the College Football Playoff committee share positive feelings about the national semifinalists.

An analysis by Block Six Analytics of 75,000 tweets from Sunday until Tuesday based on percentage of positive posts ranks the top four teams in the exact order as the playoff committee: Alabama with 65.57 percent positive tweets, followed by Clemson (65.22), Notre Dame (60.31) and Oklahoma (46.77). Those numbers also mirror expectations for the semifinals with Alabama and Clemson expected to advance to the national title game.

The four teams also follow the same order as the Amway Coaches Poll.

“Since the CFB playoff rankings were released on Sunday, favorability has increased considerably for the top three teams in the Coaches Poll,” said Adam Robbins, B6A’s head of corporate sales. “Ohio State and Georgia saw the largest favorability drop after not being selected for the playoffs.” 

B6A also looked at the top seven teams in the coaches poll for the entire season, analyzing 1.25 million tweets, which puts the margin of error below 0.5 percent, according to Alex Cordover, head of data science for B6A.

That data put Central Florida at the top of the likability ratings, just ahead of Alabama. UCF just finished its second consecutive undefeated regular season but was not close to making the playoffs. Only 16.54 percent of tweets about the Golden Knights were negative.

Strangely, Clemson received the highest percentage of negative tweets for the season (28.80) of the seven schools but the least negative since the playoff pairings were announced (7.18).

“The number of impressions is only one component in evaluating social media conversation,” Robbins said. “Understanding sentiment and engagement is crucial in measuring social media value, especially related to sports. It allows teams, leagues and brands the ability to identify topics, trends and people that are generating the most interest and value for their organization.” 

Source: Read Full Article