Scott Sanderson, former MLB All-Star pitcher, dies at 62
MLB 

Scott Sanderson, a rangy right-hander who helped his hometown Cubs end an almost four-decade postseason drought during a 19-year MLB career, died Thursday in the Chicago area. He was 62.

Conway Farms Golf Club, where Sanderson was a longtime member, confirmed the news (via the Chicago Tribune). A cause of death was not immediately known.

We are saddened by the passing of former #Cubs pitcher Scott Sanderson and share our deepest condolences with his family and friends. pic.twitter.com/OcOFdMJijx

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Though only 8-5 (3.14 ERA) in 1984, Sanderson was part of a Cubs team that won the NL East, ending a 38-year playoff absence. Five years later, he went 11-9 in 23 starts as the Cubs won their second NL East title in six seasons.

“Scotty was such a good guy,” Cubs manager Joe Maddon, who spent three seasons with Sanderson in Anaheim when Maddon was an Angels coach, told the Chicago Sun-Times. “Really thoughtful, kind — oh man, just a wonderful man.”

Drafted by the Montreal Expos out of Vanderbilt in 1977, the 6-foot-5 Sanderson made his way to the majors as a 21-year-old with only 28 minor-league starts. He spent his first six seasons with Montreal before the Cubs acquired him in a three-team trade in December 1983, and he would spend the next six seasons with Chicago.

From 1978-96, he was 163-143 with a 3.84 ERA in 472 appearances (407 starts) with the Expos, Cubs, Athletics, Yankees, Giants, White Sox and Angels.

He made his lone All-Star appearance while with the Yankees in 1991, a season in which he finished a career best 16-10 (3.81 ERA) as part of a run of five consecutive seasons of double-digit victory totals. He made two postseason appearances — with the Expos in 1981 and the A’s in 1990, appearing in the 1990 World Series in relief as Oakland was swept by the Reds.

After his retirement following the 1996 season, he worked as an agent, his most high-profile clients including Josh Beckett, Josh Hamilton and Todd Helton.

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